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Speech and Language

Fall FUNtivities!

By | Speech and Language | No Comments

Fall FUNtivities! 

Thanksgiving is just around the corner (goodness where did the time go?). We know being away from school is exciting for our kids, but it can also be difficult to keep them entertained during the week-long break. Here are a few fall-themed activities you can do with your family.

 

Leaf Artwork 

For kids who need a screen time break, encourage them to take a walk outside with you and admire the newly changing foliage. Collect a handful of leaves of varying sizes, shapes, and colors. Place the leaves under a blank sheet of paper and color over them with fall-colored crayons to make a leaf rubbing. For an added bonus, you can have your child describe the different colors they see and the texture of each leaf. It’s unbeLEAFable how simple and easy this activity is! 

 

Play With Your Food 

Have you ever told your child, “Don’t play with your food!”? For this activity, it’s highly encouraged! To go along with a Thanksgiving theme, have your child piece together different food items to create their very own turkey masterpiece. Provide a selection of snacks for them to play with and sample. Options can be anything from baby carrots, to bell pepper slices, to pretzels…the possibilities are endless. Feel free to get creative with it and most importantly, have fun! 

Apeeling Apples 

Apples are the fall fruit and there is a wide variety of them choose from at your local store or farmer’s market. Have your child sample different apple slices and describe their taste and texture. Are they sour, sweet, juicy, crunchy, etc. Drizzle in caramel sauce for an extra sweet treat!

 

Book it to the Library

If your child misses reading time, take them on a trip to the local library! The library offers free resources such as a selection of books, media, and even sensory storytime programs. Be sure to check the library hours listed to see if hours vary around Thanksgiving time. 

 

We hope you try out some of these activities! Check out our website at www.granitebayspeech.com for more blog posts.

 

Homework… Struggle or Success?

By | Back to School, Speech and Language | No Comments

 

Let’s talk about homework. Sometimes, the biggest struggle of the day is getting your child to focus on homework after a long day at school… understandably so! Who really wants to go home after a long day of school work, just to do more school work at home? We want to provide you with a few tips that might help aid you in navigating this process! 

 

Snack Time  

Everyone loves a yummy snack! Not only is it a great way to incorporate a break, but food keeps our brain functioning. Providing a healthy snack for your child can also help show them that making a healthy choice gives your brain the power to keep learning and working!

 

A Productive Work Space

It is important to provide a clean and creative workspace for your child while they are doing homework. Working around clutter can create a distraction for anyone, especially young children. Sometimes, the hardest part about homework time is keeping your child focused and on task. If they are in an area that is quiet and clean, they are more likely to be productive. 

 

Work Next to Them

When your child is doing their homework, try sitting near them or next to them while you are also doing something productive. Kids have serious F.O.M.O (fear of missing out) and they definitely don’t want to miss out on anything fun. So, while they are doing their work, maybe you can simultaneously do chores or work on “adult stuff” in the background! It will encourage your child to work hard if they see you working hard too. 

 

We hope this information was helpful! Please visit our website at www.granitebayspeech.com for more blogs!

Q&A With Parents of Children Who Stutter

By | Community Events, Speech and Language, Stuttering | No Comments

 

These amazing parents have worked with their children and the Therapists at Granite Bay Speech to help their children effectively communicate in their community. It can be difficult when the world around us does not understand what it is like to stutter.

Aaron explains some important techniques that he has learned and implemented which help his son and his students who stutter.

  1. Lead by example and stretch your word first
  2. Repeat what the person says to let him know that you are listening
  3. Be patient
  4. Use non-verbal gestures demonstrating a stretch to remind him of his techniques

Watch the video to see how another parent explains her experience in the community with her son who stutters.

Most importantly, remember to respond to WHAT the person is saying, rather than HOW they are saying it. 

 

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us!

916-797-3307

Surviving a Technology-Driven World

By | Community Events, Speech and Language | No Comments

Screenshot (3)

We are using electronic forms of communication more than ever, but do mediums such as texting, emailing and posting on social media truly count as “communicating?” Technology has changed our lives in many ways. While it has helped us accomplish great things, it has also changed how we communicate with others. Experts in the field are concerned about the current communication trend as the overuse of popular technology may lead to diminished speech, language and hearing abilities.

 

Statistics

 

  • 68% of 2 year olds use tablets at home
  • Every 30 mins of daily screen use increased the risk of expressive speech delay in children ages 6 months to 2 years by almost 50%
  • 44% of kids under 6 would rather play a game on a technology device than read a book or be read to
  • 48 minutes is the average amount of time spent on a mobile device per day by children under 8
  • 78% of teens check their devices at least hourly
  • 4 out of 5 smartphone users check their phones within 15 minutes of waking up

While the statistics are alarming, there are ways we can help combat the issue.

 

Tips For Managing Tech-Time

  • Find at least one or two opportunities during the day to create tech-free times
  • Plan activities to keep children entertained rather than relying on technology
  • While educational apps do teach new skills, remember that children learn best through talking, conversing and reading
  • Social interaction is important so try to make tech use a group activity, such as while playing with family members or an online game with others
  • If young kids need their own tech devices for certain reasons, consider using one with features that provide extra security and limit content
  • Set screen time limits and keep track of the usage yourself or use devices that turn off automatically
  • Be consistent in implementing the rules you set for tech usage
  • Be sure to model the safe tech habits you want your kids to take after
  • Learn signs of communication disorders and ask for help from a Speech Language Pathologist if you notice something that may spark any concerns or questions.

Do you have any questions or concerns? Please contact us at 916-797-3307 or visit our website at www.granitebayspeech.com 

Sources:
Healthy Communication & Popular Technology Initiative
National Association for Hearing and Speech Action
ASHA: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 198,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students.

My child has difficulty remembering and paying attention. What do I do?

By | Community Events, Social Skills, Speech and Language | No Comments

My child has difficulty remembering and paying attention. 

What do I do? 

We are excited to feature this blog on the Granite Bay Speech website written by our colleague and friend, Kathie E. Ekemo, Ph.D. CA Licensed Psychologist PSY29127. Dr. Kathie Ekemo specializes in psychological evaluations for children, adolescents and adults.

As seen on a Sussex Directories Inc site

Children with attention difficulties may:

  • Have a short attention span or difficulty paying attention
  • Be distracted or have trouble focusing if there is a lot of noise around
  • Be fidgety
  • Be easily frustrated
  • Have negative feelings about school or difficulty with academic performance.

These symptoms of inattention are shared by multiple disorders, and

may be the result of:

  • Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • A visual processing disorder
  • Sensory integration difficulties
  • Language Disorders
  • A central auditory processing disorder
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Various medical conditions/syndromes or injuries (e.g. brain injury)
  • Learning disability (attention)
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder
  • Other causes

A psychologist can help parents to figure out any difficulties that may be causing attentional problems, as well as providing treatment recommendations.  These screenings typically include checklists, and/or testing.  Once the source/s of the attentional problems are identified, Kathie Ekemo, Ph.D and Granite Bay Speech coordinate treatment to benefit clients and achieve better outcomes.  Many auditory challenges, for example, can be assessed and are successfully treated by a speech language pathologist.  Care may also be coordinated with your medical doctor, a visual therapist or occupational therapist.

We would be happy to answer any of your questions!

Please feel free to contact Kathie E. Ekemo, Ph.D. at 425-308-7982 or message Kathie through www.Psychologytoday.com 

You may also contact Nancy Barcal M.A. CCC-SLP at Granite Bay Speech at 916-797-3307 or visit the website at https://www.granitebayspeech.com 

Why is Pretend Play Important?

By | Speech and Language | No Comments

  mila pretend play 2

As adults, we often reference the occurrence of pretend play as just that… play! But, we may fail to recognize the critical role that play has in the cognitive, social-emotional, and motor development of our children. Let’s take a closer look at pretend play’s benefits and the positive effect it has on our little ones!

Imagination utilized in play activities requires strong problem-solving skills – higher level, cognitive thinking is necessary to not only imagine, but bring characters, settings, and plots to life! When children are setting the scene for their pretend play scenarios, they pull information from their experiences, which allows for the creation of memories and improves their memory-recall abilities.

Research shows that pretend play promotes the development of social-emotional skills, where children are actively experimenting with the social and emotional roles that they witness in everyday life. It provides opportunities for children to make sense of the situations they observe and to ‘test out’ new ones that may be confusing, scary, or anxiety-provoking.  Through imaginative play, dolls or figurines can become a ‘version’ of a child, providing a safe way for them to express new ideas, feelings, and emotions.

Our children incorporate language in play and feel the power of their words. They learn to read social cues, take turns, initiate and engage in reciprocal conversation, control impulsivity, and recognize emotions. Through the development of these abilities, they are also increasing their ‘theory of mind’ – the capacity to take another’s perspective and understand the feelings of others to feel empathetic.

Amazingly enough, motor skills are also enhanced through pretend play. Gross motor skills are required for actions such as, making animal figurines jump or airplanes fly through the sky, and fine motor skills are needed for activities such as dressing dolls, carefully placing items in dollhouses or building, or piecing together tracks for a train. The concepts of grouping and categorizing are also enhanced, which can be demonstrated through scenarios of grouping food items together to create a meal or a grocery store.

Granite Bay Speech believes in the power of pretend play and we encourage its’ utilization for all children. Contact our office for more information and tips for expanding your child’s imagination.

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.” -Albert Einstein

Call our office at: 916-797-3307

What is Articulation?

By | Speech and Language | No Comments

kim tanner articulation

Articulation skills are most commonly referred to as “speech skills”. Articulation refers to the process of two areas of the body touching to form speech sounds. When we speak, a set of very complex and coordinated movements allow us to form sounds which are understood by others. More than one hundred muscles have to contract and relax to begin and end each syllable.

We would be happy to answer any of your questions!

Please feel free to give us a call at 916-797-3307 or visit our website at www.granitebayspeech.com 

Forbrain is now available at Granite Bay Speech!

By | Back to School, Promotions, Speech and Language, Stuttering | No Comments

forbrain-2

Forbrain is Now available at Granite Bay Speech!

Improve three critical speech and language areas with one device! Forbrain is a device which helps to improve your attention, speech, and memory. Forbrain helps children and adults develop their talents and potential by using their voice.

Why use Forbrain?

Attention

Forbrain’s dynamic filter trains the brain to be more attentive, improving not only attention, but auditory processing and sensory integration.

Speech

Forbrain helps individuals improve speech fluency, pronunciation, sound discrimination and rhythm, resulting in clearer and more effective communication.

Memory

Forbrain helps to improve short term memory, which impacts reading, writing and even chatting.

How does it work?

Bone conduction

Bone conduction transmits the sound of your own voice 10 times faster and with greater clarity than air conduction.

Dynamic filter

The dynamic filter enhances specific frequencies of speech and constantly surprises the brain to increase memory, attention and sensory processing.

Auditory Feedback Loop

Forbrain corrects the way you hear your own voice leading to better speech production and increased confidence.

 

What are people saying about Forbrain?

“By hearing their own voice, they gained confidence in speaking words out loud”

“After some weeks of use of Forbrain, there is definitely a difference in the clarity of his speech”

“I have seen tremendous improvement in her reading comprehension and reading rhythm”

“Forbrain has been a very successful tool and consider it such a blessing to our family!”

 

Want to give Forbrain a try?

At Granite Bay Speech, we are committed to utilizing the latest research based techniques and technology to help advance speech and language skills at any age. We have researched Forbrain and believe this is a wonderful tool to improve attention, speech and memory skills.

Forbrain is now available to purchase and use independently at home OR use in your sessions at Granite Bay Speech! Contact us to learn more about the opportunity to improve your attention, speech and memory skills.

Email us at info@granitebayspeech.com

Call us at 916-797-3307

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