Category

Stuttering

Ask The Expert

By | Stuttering | No Comments

Ask The Expert

Nancy Barcal was asked to be on the panel for the International Stuttering Awareness Conference. She was part of the panel of experts in the field of stuttering. People were allowed to ask any question pertaining to stuttering.

One group of Graduate students studying to be Speech-Language Pathologists asked Nancy a question. We felt this question was incredibly relevant to what many people may be wondering and feeling. We wanted to share Nancy’s answer with you.

 

Question:

We are graduate speech-language pathology students who are currently enrolled in a course that covers stuttering. As we are learning more about stuttering and interacting more with people who stutter, a few questions have come up. First, in your experience, what is the best way to interact with individuals who stutter while remaining sensitive, but still addressing the stutter? How do these individuals typically react or want you to react? How have your interactions changed as you have become more experienced within the field? Thanks so much for your time. We appreciate any tips or suggestions you can share. 

Best,

Rosi, Sarah, Maggie

 

Nancy’s Answer:

As graduate students, you have probably had very little interaction, if any, with individuals who stutter. I am happy to tell you that people who stutter (PWS) are just like the rest of us. They will display variations in preferences and responses. Your interaction will be slightly different if you are meeting a person who stutters in a social situation versus being assigned to see them as a therapist in the clinic.

I’ll address the therapy situation first. As a new therapist, I remember being very worried about whether or not I would react in the correct way.

In terms of your physical and verbal reactions, treat the PWS as if they didn‘t stutter. Keep natural eye contact. If the person has a hard block or long prolongation or significant facial movement, you may be tempted to show your surprise. This will be less likely if you have desensitized yourself to seeing and hearing stuttering. Watch lots of videotapes of PWS so you’ll be used to it and you won’t be shocked by anything you see or hear. Your face and your heart should be calm and reflect a normal expression. If PWS are talking, just keep quiet and wait. Don’t interrupt. Wait until they are finished talking. Then you talk. It’s simple common courtesy not to talk until your conversational partner is finished sharing their idea, so don’t treat a person who stutters any differently. Just wait. I can’t emphasize that enough. You will be tempted to talk too soon. Stop. Don’t do it. Wait. Think of how rude it would be if someone talked before you were finished or they finished your sentence for you! You’d be insulted. What if they finished it with the wrong word? Then you’d have to start your thought again and you’d be frustrated they didn’t give you time to finish your idea. If you need help waiting then practice silently counting to three before you talk. Tap your fingers silently in your palm to stop yourself from talking too soon. Practice waiting and pacing your speech with another therapist before you conduct your first session.

I will share some of the key components of a successful first session as a new therapist. Be sincere and honest. Share that you’d love to learn more about stuttering. You’ve read a lot about the topic and now you’d like to hear about stuttering from an expert-the person who stutters. You might ask them some of the following questions: If you’ve been in therapy before what did you like or dislike? What worked and what didn’t? Are there techniques they really want to avoid or ones they’d like to practice more? What techniques do they remember and what were the techniques labeled? (Some people call the same technique by various labels; easy onset, soft starts…). After they list the names of techniques then ask them to demonstrate the techniques and teach you. You imitate their models and then they provide feedback about how well you are doing or provide you with additional instruction. Share that you are just learning the skills and they will need to help you. This places them in a position of not only explaining techniques to you so you see what they know but it also provides insight into their ability to demonstrate what they know in theory. You will also experience what it’s like to apply the techniques and you’ll understand a little bit about how difficult it is to concentrate on changing motor skills. If the person likes some techniques then ask them when and where they use them. do they only use with a few people or with large groups? What are their goals for therapy? Why did they decide to get help now? Plan your session so no matter what their response you have at least one goal and one specific home activity to use before their next session. Involve them in writing a realistic goal.

Now my answer to talking to PWS in a social situation. Respond to what the person says not how they say it. We all want to be accepted, loved and valued.

In social situations, we all have our own definition of what a successful interaction entails. Ask 100 people what annoys them about social events and you’ll get a variety of answers. One person says they get annoyed if people at a party are quiet. They love talking, asking lots of questions and learning details about everyone’s life at the party. Another person prefers to find a quiet corner and talk to one or two people all night and hold in-depth discussions. Just like all of us, individuals who stutter have a range of comfort levels in social situations.

If you’re interested in learning more about stuttering, ask people who stutter. Ask them what it feels like to stutter, how they wish people would react and what they wish everyone knew about stuttering. If you are truly passionate about stuttering, then spend time researching, interviewing and enjoying your time with PWS. I am a bit biased because I have found individuals who stutter to be some of the most incredibly kind, sensitive, compassionate, intelligent and insightful human beings I have ever met. It has been a wonderful honor to share the journey with people who stutter for nearly 40 years. I encourage more SLP’s to specialize in stuttering because it’s a wonderful journey.

Stuttering Expert Available

By | Community Events, Stuttering | No Comments

Stuttering Expert Available

If you are interested in learning more about stuttering, you can learn from one of the best! Nancy Barcal has worked with stuttering and cluttering for nearly 40 years. Due to her high level of expertise, Nancy has been invited to answer questions about stuttering during the worldwide International Stuttering Awareness Day (ISAD) organization’s conference.

The conference runs from October 1 until October 22, International Stuttering Awareness Day.

 

To participate, you must be logged in to ask a question. After you log in, select ‘New’; ‘Post’ from the top menu and enter the title and details. Be sure to set the category to ‘2019 Talk to a Professional’ on the right side of the page or your question will not display on this page.

Please join us as we participate in the 22nd Annual Online Conference for International Stuttering Awareness Day!

 

http://isad.isastutter.org/ 

A Letter to My Teacher…

By | Back to School, Stuttering | No Comments

A letter to my teacher… from a student who stutters.

Elijah was once very shy about his stuttering. Since attending therapy at Granite Bay Speech, he has become more confident, outgoing and able to voice his thoughts and feelings. Elijah understands that he is not defined by his stutter, and wrote this letter to his teachers. He allowed us to share this letter with you and hopes it may inspire you or someone you know. Feel free to share!

Dear Teachers,

My name is Elijah I’m in seventh grade and I’m 12 years old. I’ll be 13 in September. I have played a lot of sports, including, soccer, lacrosse basketball and water polo. I decided to focus on the lacross. I might add water polo when I am in high school.

Another interesting fact about me is that I stutter. I have stuttered since I was eight years old. When it started I would get stuck on my words and try and push the sound out and that only made it worse. I went to speech classes and I am able to talk without getting stuck often. If you hear me stutter you don’t have to help me. I need you to wait until I’m finished talking and don’t try to finish my words. When anyone asks me about my stuttering I tell them, “it’s not a big deal, I know what I want to say so please be polite and don’t interrupt me.”

 If someone gets teased about their stuttering, I would tell them to just keep talking and use your speech techniques from your speech therapist. I try to stop pushing on my sounds and then use a little stretch on my vowel to ease into speech. Some days are tough speech days and I stutter more, especially if I’m tired or excited. I try to pause more often so I speak smoother and don’t lose my breath. I’ve learned to be patient and compassionate because I’ve struggled with stuttering. I think that’s why I am patient with older people. I’m proud of who I am!

Q&A With Parents of Children Who Stutter

By | Community Events, Speech and Language, Stuttering | No Comments

 

These amazing parents have worked with their children and the Therapists at Granite Bay Speech to help their children effectively communicate in their community. It can be difficult when the world around us does not understand what it is like to stutter.

Aaron explains some important techniques that he has learned and implemented which help his son and his students who stutter.

  1. Lead by example and stretch your word first
  2. Repeat what the person says to let him know that you are listening
  3. Be patient
  4. Use non-verbal gestures demonstrating a stretch to remind him of his techniques

Watch the video to see how another parent explains her experience in the community with her son who stutters.

Most importantly, remember to respond to WHAT the person is saying, rather than HOW they are saying it. 

 

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us!

916-797-3307

How to Effectively Communicate with People Who Stutter

By | Community Events, Stuttering | No Comments

 

With National Stuttering Awareness day coming up on October 22nd, Granite Bay Speech has developed bookmarks and wallet cards that you can share to help spread awareness in your community. Each bookmark and wallet card outlines 5 tips to effectively communicate with people who stutter to ensure that all communication experiences are good experiences. These can be shared with classmates, friends, family members and teachers that may be unaware of some actions that might lead to a communication breakdown with a person who stutters.

 

Follow the link below to grab your free bookmarks and wallet cards!

 

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/How-to-Effectively-Communicate-with-People-Who-Stutter-4136807

Spring into Fluency with this great deal!

By | Promotions, Stuttering | No Comments
speecheasy

Spring Into Fluency!

Spring is the season of renewal – and it’s the perfect time to stop, reflect, and reassess where you are with your goals.  If improving your fluency is one of those goals, we can help!

For a limited time SpeechEasy is offering a $500 discount on ANY SpeechEasy model, AND a $250 rebate on your SpeechEasy evaluation.  That’s a combined $750 in savings!  There has never been a better time to take the next step in reaching your goals.

These amazing offers end on July 15th, so act fast.

Contact us at Granite Bay Speech for more information!

916-797-3307

 

 

 

Forbrain is now available at Granite Bay Speech!

By | Back to School, Promotions, Speech and Language, Stuttering | No Comments

forbrain-2

Forbrain is Now available at Granite Bay Speech!

Improve three critical speech and language areas with one device! Forbrain is a device which helps to improve your attention, speech, and memory. Forbrain helps children and adults develop their talents and potential by using their voice.

Why use Forbrain?

Attention

Forbrain’s dynamic filter trains the brain to be more attentive, improving not only attention, but auditory processing and sensory integration.

Speech

Forbrain helps individuals improve speech fluency, pronunciation, sound discrimination and rhythm, resulting in clearer and more effective communication.

Memory

Forbrain helps to improve short term memory, which impacts reading, writing and even chatting.

How does it work?

Bone conduction

Bone conduction transmits the sound of your own voice 10 times faster and with greater clarity than air conduction.

Dynamic filter

The dynamic filter enhances specific frequencies of speech and constantly surprises the brain to increase memory, attention and sensory processing.

Auditory Feedback Loop

Forbrain corrects the way you hear your own voice leading to better speech production and increased confidence.

 

What are people saying about Forbrain?

“By hearing their own voice, they gained confidence in speaking words out loud”

“After some weeks of use of Forbrain, there is definitely a difference in the clarity of his speech”

“I have seen tremendous improvement in her reading comprehension and reading rhythm”

“Forbrain has been a very successful tool and consider it such a blessing to our family!”

 

Want to give Forbrain a try?

At Granite Bay Speech, we are committed to utilizing the latest research based techniques and technology to help advance speech and language skills at any age. We have researched Forbrain and believe this is a wonderful tool to improve attention, speech and memory skills.

Forbrain is now available to purchase and use independently at home OR use in your sessions at Granite Bay Speech! Contact us to learn more about the opportunity to improve your attention, speech and memory skills.

Email us at info@granitebayspeech.com

Call us at 916-797-3307

My Battle Against The Stutter Monsters!

By | Speech and Language, Stuttering | No Comments

 

This video is a story about a young boy winning the battle against stutter monsters. This book was written by Elijah Silberman and his Speech Therapist, Nancy Barcal M.A. CCC-SLP.

This book is about how Elijah fought the stutter monsters. At first Elijah feels his stuttering is choking his throat. His words feel blocked and won’t come out. He repeats sounds many times before he is able to talk. Elijah is getting very frustrated. He doesn’t know how to stop his stuttering. He decides to go on a quest. He learns skills with the help of his Speech Language Pathologist, Nancy Barcal. In the book, “My battle against the stutter monsters” Elijah protects his smooth speech behind the walls of his castle. He does his best to keep the stutter monsters out of the castle by practicing therapy techniques. He earns his many weapons to protect him from the assault of the stutter monsters. He earns a shield, armor, a sword, cannon, cannon balls, a bow and arrows, He uses these weapons to shoot at the stutter monsters and destroy their power over him. He takes control and practices many hours to beat them. In the end he discovers that he is powerful. Elijah learns that even if a few stutter monsters sneak into his castle he is still in control and doesn’t let it bother him. He says what he wants and doesn’t let stuttering stop him from talking. He has a positive attitude and knows how to stand up to teasing and is proud of conquering his fear of stuttering.

 

2018 Granite Bay Speech Media Award

By | Community Events, Stuttering | No Comments

We were pleased to present John Gomez with the Annual Media Award! Here is what he said about it.

john with award
“This is a very Special Award that comes from Nancy Barcal of Granite Bay Speech! Nancy runs a Speech-Language Pathology private practice in Granite Bay, CA. She and her business have championed WHEN I STUTTER since the very beginning. To receive this award from such a pillar in the community and a friend is a tremendous honor!”- John Gomez

To learn more about John’s incredible movie, WHEN I STUTTER, visit his website at http://www.whenistutter.org

FLUENCYCOACH™ IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR ANDROID!

By | Stuttering | No Comments

OBTAIN FREE STUTTERING HELP!

FLUENCYCOACH™ IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR ANDROID!

 

 

FluencyCoach™ is a free app created to help improve fluency for individuals who stutter or clutter using delayed auditory feedback (DAF) and frequency altered feedback (FAF). FluencyCoach™ was originally accessible using only Apple products; however, after years of testing and software development a new design has been released allowing Android and Apple users to experience the potential benefits of FluencyCoach™ on stuttering.

 

Learn more about how to improve fluency using therapy techniques and apps, by calling Granite Bay Speech. Schedule a free phone consultation with our director and owner, Nancy Barcal. Nancy is a licensed Speech Language Pathologist and longtime volunteer for the National Stuttering Association (NSA). For over 35 years, Nancy has helped thousands of individuals achieve better fluency. Nancy will provide you with options to achieve better fluency using proven research based techniques and technology. Stuttering can be improved at any age. Call today and don’t miss this opportunity to reduce frustration and improve your fluency.

teens talking

Contact Granite Bay Speech Today!

Phone: (916) 797-3307

Email: info@granitebayspeech.com

Website: www.granitebayspeech.com

2530 Douglas Blvd. Suite 110

Roseville, CA 95661

© 2020 Granite Bay Speech.